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Blue, Turning Grey Over You - Louis Armstrong - Vol. 2. Ive Got The World On A String. Original Recordings 1930-1933 (CD) download full album zip cd mp3 vinyl flac


Download Blue, Turning Grey Over You - Louis Armstrong - Vol. 2. Ive Got The World On A String. Original Recordings 1930-1933 (CD)
2002
Label: Naxos Jazz Legends - 8.120609 • Format: CD Compilation • Country: Europe • Genre: Jazz, Blues •

The urgency of the version isn't Blue, but he's in greater command of his instrument remember when he kind of fluffed that one high note on the OKeh and from a rhythmic standpoint, he's almost more free-floating than ever before in I wrote the other day about how the younger Armstrong tended to approach slower tempos with more fleet-fingered playing.

I should have added the same as sometimes true of the later Armstrong: listen to "That's For Me" from"You Can Depend On Me" from and this track for some great examples. With the All Stars turning up the heat in their rhythmically accented backing, Armstrong responds by completely rhapsodizing with his improvisation, leading into a stunning break, started with a gliss to a high B before another string of G's that shake me to my core.

It's standard Armstrong, building up to a long, held high C, shook for all its glory. Put Turning Grey Over You - Louis Armstrong - Vol. 2. Ive Got The World On A String. Original Recordings 1930-1933 (CD) in the time capsule If you really feel like starting an argument, you can say, "But wait, Rick, the original was one solid take while Armstrong's s' Columbia recordings featured songs and solos pieced together from various takes by George Avakian All of his artists were thankful for it and the end results George got more than speak for themselves.

Though the kindness of George and David Ostwald, I was able to listen to the complete session reels for Satch Plays Fats during the preparation for my upcoming book, including about 25 minutes of takes of "Blue Turning Grey Over You. After running through the arrangement, the band still didn't have things down cold when Avakian began rolling the tapes for takes 1 and 2, each of which breaks down Louis can be heard practicing his first scat break during one of the breaks; it's one he originally sang on the version so I wonder if he had listened to it to keep it fresh.

Finally, on take 3, everything clicked and the band was well on its way to making a perfect take when it all fell apart during the final bridge as the band couldn't exactly get the rhythms straight on how they wanted to back Armstrong. Armstrong asked, "Is the rest all right? From the sixth bar through the finish, Armstrong played what appeared on the final record you can barely hear a splice at the mark on the master.

Thus, that final masterpiece of a solo is almost entirely one take so I don't want to hear anything about it being the work of an editor. Got it? Happy, George still called a few more takes to have some vocals and opening choruses to choose from. Louis, ever the professional, knows when things aren't right; he calls off one take when his voice doesn't quite make a high note during a scat break and he calls off the fourth full take when the band takes too long to enter after one of the breaks.

George finally got a Blue vocal on take 5 and another damn good trumpet solo, to boot more on that in a minute. Arvell Shaw complained of a "goof" at the end of the take and Armstrong brought up something else that didn't go quite right but George brushed it off, saying that there was plenty to splice from the other takes.

So yes, the opening solo is from one take, and the vocal is from take five and the solo is almost entirely the insert take after the third attempt The final result more than speaks for itself. It's an absolute masterpiece, one that we could not have enjoyed if George Avakian hadn't recorded and edited it InSony finally reissued Satch Plays Fats but idiotically didn't include a set of new liner notes Avakian wrote for the occasion.

They also could have made it a deluxe box set with many of the full alternate takes that survive. Unfortunately, in Sony's eyes, the name Louis Armstrong doesn't mean the same thing as the name Miles Davis and that's a crying shame. Sony did release four "edited alternate takes" on the album but didn't make any attempt to explain what they Turning Grey Over You - Louis Armstrong - Vol.

2. Ive Got The World On A String. Original Recordings 1930-1933 (CD). They included one of "Blue Turning Grey Over You" and I personally think it's another masterpiece, another example of how much greatness poured out of Armstrong on this session.

Being an "edited alternate take" means just Turning Grey Over You - Louis Armstrong - Vol. 2. Ive Got The World On A String. Original Recordings 1930-1933 (CD) it says: this take is all of take three until it broke down at the final bridge.

From the bridge on, it uses Armstrong's concluding solo from the fifth and final take. Armstrong's scat break is a "gassuh" I love that "Yeah, man!

Here's the "edited alternate": See what I mean? I could only imagine how tough it was for George Avakian to make his final editing choices. But George, God bless him--he'll be 91 next month--made the right choices so let's be thankful that.

And let's be thankful to Fats Waller and Andy Razaf for writing such a beautiful song. And of course, thanks to Pops and the All Stars, who in the face of almost unyielding criticism in the s and s, continued to make such timeless, glorious music as the performances shared today.

I hope you were as moved by them as I. Have a wonderful weekend and if you're one of my fellow east coasters who is going to be shoveling snow for the next two or three days, just blast "Blue Turning Grey Over You" out of some loudspeakers Armstrong is renowned for his charismatic stage presence and voice almost as much as for his trumpet playing. Armstrong's influence extends well beyond jazz, and by the end of his career in the s, he was widely regarded as a profound influence on popular music in general.

Armstrong was one of the first truly popular African-American entertainers to "cross over", that is, whose skin color became secondary to his music in an America that was extremely racially divided at the time. He rarely publicly politicized his race, often to the dismay of fellow African Americans, but took a well-publicized stand for desegregation in the Little Rock crisis. His artistry and personality allowed him access to the upper echelons of American society, then highly restricted for black men, Blue.

Hot lyrics. Featured lyrics. My, my, how I miss your tender kiss And the wonderful things you would do Now I run my hands through silvery strands Because I'm blue, turning grey over You used to be so sweet to me, baby That's when I was a novelty You have new thrills and view, found someone new Left me blue, turning grey over you.


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  1. Discover releases, reviews, track listings, recommendations, and more about Louis Armstrong With Russell Garcia And His Orchestra - I've Got The World On A String at Discogs. Complete your Louis Armstrong With Russell Garcia And His Orchestra collection.
  2. And the wonderful things you would do Now I run my hands through silvery strands Because I'm blue, turning grey over You used to be so sweet to me, baby That's when I was a novelty You have new thrills and view, found someone new Left me blue, turning grey over you.
  3. Louis Armstrong With Russell Garcia And His Orchestra: Louis Armstrong With Russell Garcia And His Orchestra - I've Got The World On A String ‎ (LP, Album) Verve Records: MG VS US: Sell This Version.
  4. This is the second recording Louis Armstrong made of W.C. Handy’s classic “St. Louis Blues.” The first was a slow, heartfelt recording in with Armstrong on cornet and blues great Bessie Smith on vocals. This version is every bit as brilliant, but that is where the comparison stops, because the two sound nothing alike.
  5. Gee, how I miss Your tender kiss, And the wonderful things we would do. Now I run my hands Through silvery strands, You left me blue turning gray over you. You used to be So good to me, That's when I was a novelty. Now, you've new friends in view, You've found someone new, And left me blue turning gray over you.
  6. Louis Armstrong. Louis Armstrong (August 4, – July 6, ), nicknamed Satchmo or Pops, was an American jazz trumpeter and singer from New Orleans, Louisiana. Update this biography» Complete biography of Louis Armstrong».
  7. Louis Armstrong (–), nicknamed Satchmo or Pops, was an American trumpeter, composer, singer and occasional actor who was one of the most influential figures in jazz and in all of American popular music. His career spanned five decades, from the s to the s, and different eras in jazz. Coming to prominence in the s as an "inventive" trumpet and cornet player, Armstrong .

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